Negotiating
For You.

Our Job is to Represent You

We protect our customers by working with a national cooperative of TV providers, negotiating fees and programming on your behalf. We want you to have access to all your favorite programs at a price that’s fair. We know that anything less is unacceptable – it’s why we go to bat for you.

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    Channels you want: As local cable operators, we work every day on behalf of our customers to make sure you have access to the channels you want, when you want them.

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    Fair price: When networks demand higher fees, local cable operators are forced to pass along some of these costs to customers. We fight for lower rates for you.

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    Blackouts: When disputes occur, programmers will often take high-visibility TV programs off the air to negotiate deals in their favor. For the local cable operator and our customers, the impact can be significant. Our goal is to come to an agreement before this happens.

We are a local business. We are our own customers, too. This means we invest in our networks here, and are committed to serving you – our friends, families and neighbors.

“While we have been thorough in building and implementing a program that mitigates as much risk as possible, we knew it would be impossible to eliminate all risk -- as evidenced by the three positive tests this week,” the Tour said in a statement released this afternoon. “We need to use these developments as a stark reminder for everyone involved as we continue to learn from an operational standpoint."

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"They've waited until the last possible minute to pick these (host) cities," Haggerty told host Gary Tanguay. "The reason they're doing that is because they want the latest possible data on COVID-19: where there's outbreaks, where there might be problems. They didn't want to run into a situation the NBA is running into now where they picked Orlando, Fla., a long time ago."

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"The Hall will honor the Centennial Class of 2020 next August, along with what promises to be an equally spectacular Class of 2021, as part of a multi-day celebration of football with an atmosphere that will deliver for fans 'Twice the Fun in ’21.'"

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The NBA is set to resume in Florida right when coronavirus cases are surging in the state. The games themselves will take place at Walt Disney World, where the players will be electronically tracked and monitored. There’s a very serious risk that restarting the season will directly lead to people getting seriously sick or even dying. Some players seem to think that even playing basketball at all could end up distracting people from more important issues.

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Major League Baseball is set to return. The MLB Players Association (MLBPA) informed the league Tuesday that players will comply with commissioner Rob Manfred's imposed outline for a 60-game 2020 season. Players are set report for another version of "spring" training on July 1, and the regular season will start either July 23 or 24, the league announced.

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Today marks 103 days since the last MLB, NBA, NFL or NHL game — the longest such drought since the fall of 1918, when the World Series was held in September amid WWI and the Spanish flu.

Meanwhile, abroad: Multiple countries have seen major sports return. The world's four biggest soccer leagues (England, Spain, Italy, Germany) are back; baseball resumed in Japan this weekend; and basketball resumed in China.

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"Positive tests are going to happen," NFL commissioner Roger Goodell admitted Monday in a conversation with Mike Greenberg for ESPN's The Return of Sports special. "The issue is, can we obviously prevent as many of those from happening, but in addition, treat them quickly, isolate them and prevent them from directly impacting our player personnel.

"So none of those players were in the facilities. All of those players, fortunately, have had either mild symptoms or are asymptomatic."

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The NCAA College Football Oversight Committee will submit a detailed four-phase plan next week for football activities to begin in mid-July. The committee will recommend that coaches begin interacting with players on July 13 with training camp starting on Aug. 7.

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Q: Other businesses, like auto insurers, are giving refunds because people are driving less. It seems like you should do the same.

A: We agree, but the insurance companies are giving refunds because they are seeing reduced costs – less driving and fewer accidents. Costs haven’t been reduced for us and other TV providers because the sports networks and leagues haven’t given refunds at this time.

There’s been a lot of buzz around the idea of sports networks refunding distributors who then refund customers for per-subscriber fees thanks to the current lack of live sports, but John Ourand of Sports Business Journal has poured some significant cold water on that, particularly in the case of ESPN. But as per Ourand, their contracts may provide them some significant protection, as their event promise is reportedly over a 12-month period, and even if they missed that target, they’d have another six months (until September 2021) to remedy the situation before distributors can start seeking rebates under the contract.

That’s significantly different than the regional sports networks, which teams have agreed to provide a certain amount of games to each year and which have in turn agreed to provide that number of games to distributors. But Ourand notes that it’s also unlikely that the RSNs “will provide full rebates to distributors,” as most of the NBA and NHL games this season were played. This could change depending on what happens with MLB and with the planned resumption of the NHL and NBA seasons.

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